Stop and search powers eased to tackle menace of knife crime

0
36



Her reforms meant all forces required an officer of chief superintendent rank to sign off a Section 60 authorising searches because there were reasonable grounds to believe violence was going to take place.

Under today’s changes, a lower ranked inspector will be able to sign off the powers. It is estimated that this will result in at least 3,000 more officers being able to sanction the searches.

In addition, the degree of certainty required has been lowered, so that the authorising officer must reasonably believe serious violence “may” occur.

Mr Javid said: “Stop and search is a hugely effective power when it comes to disrupting crime, taking weapons of our streets and keeping us safe.

“That’s why we are making it simpler for police in areas particularly affected by serious violence to use Section 60 and increasing the number of officers who can authorise the power.”

Mrs May, who will host a summit on serious youth violence on Monday, said: “As a whole society, we also need to take a hard look at the root causes of these crimes so we can intervene earlier and stop young people from being drawn into violence in the first place.”

Section 60 is often approved for major public events, such as last year’s Notting Hill Carnival, or when police anticipate reprisal gangland attacks.

In 2017/18, police in England and Wales carried out 2,501 stops and searches under section 60, up from 631 in the previous year.



LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here