Standing up on planes may be the future – but could you perch on this saddle seat for a whole flight?

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AS airlines cram more and more passengers onto planes, seats are becoming smaller and leg room seems to be disappearing before our eyes.

But the crush in economy class could be about to get even worse – as the budget-conscious may soon be offered the option to stay “standing” for the flight.

Aviointeriors has presented the Skyrider 3.0 - an improved version of its 'stand-up' plane seat
Avio Interiors

Aviointeriors has presented the Skyrider 3.0 – an improved version of its ‘stand-up’ plane seat[/caption]

Passengers’ legs would hang off the saddle, as if you were riding a horse
aviointeriors.it

Passengers’ legs would hang off the saddle, as if you were riding a horse[/caption]

The first example of a “stand-up” plane seat was presented at this week’s Paris Air Show.

Named SkyRider, the seat has a bike-style saddle that sits higher than a traditional airline seat.

Passengers’ legs would hang off the saddle, as if you were riding a horse.

A knee cut-out provides another precious few inches of legroom, but the seats are definitely not for the claustrophobic flyer.

The Skyrider, designed by Aviointeriors, takes up much less space than the average economy seat — just 23 inches compared to 31 inches on most other airlines.

The idea is that airlines could cram in more of these seats and still allow other passengers to book other kinds of tickets on the same flight.

“The message is, we do not want to put thousands of people in the cabin, we want to offer a multi-class configuration, which is nowadays impossible if you want to reach the maximum load of passengers,” Gaetano Perugini, engineering adviser at Aviointeriors told CNN Travel.

“So that means that in the same cabin, you will have standard economy, premium economy or business class and ultra-basic economy — which is an innovation for the airline and the passenger.

“This is the true reason for the Skyrider.”

The design was first proposed back in 2010, but some structural issues prevented it from taking off.

The second version, which premiered in 2018, evolved the design, featuring a pole to keep the seat in place.

The latest design, the 3.0, does not have a pole.

Aviointeriors says there has been a lot of interest in the seats, but no airline has actually made a purchase yet.

It is also unclear whether the seat would meet government safety standards for emergencies.

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