Samsung’s £899 Galaxy Note 9 ‘catches fire’ inside a woman’s purse

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Samsung’s £899 ($1,000) Galaxy Note 9 caught fire inside a woman’s purse, according to a new lawsuit.

It comes just two years after the firm was forced to issue a worldwide recall for its Note smartphones due to problems with overheating.

For the first time the supposedly fireproof Galaxy Note 9 has spontaneously caught fire inside a woman’s purse, according to the lawsuit. 

Samsung has repeatedly claimed its new Note smartphone is not at risk of the same overheating issues that plagued a previous generation of the handset.

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Samsung's £899 ($1,000) Galaxy Note 9 (pictured) 'caught fire' inside a woman's purse, according to a new lawsuit. It comes just two years after the firm was forced to issue a worldwide recall for its Note devices over overheating problems

Samsung’s £899 ($1,000) Galaxy Note 9 (pictured) ‘caught fire’ inside a woman’s purse, according to a new lawsuit. It comes just two years after the firm was forced to issue a worldwide recall for its Note devices over overheating problems

‘The battery in the Galaxy Note 9 is safer than ever. Users do not have to worry about the batteries anymore,’ said CEO Koh Dong-jin ahead of its launch on August 24.

Another executive, Kate Beaumont, director of product planning, said that it would ‘absolutely not’ catch fire, according to an article by the NY Post.

However, according to new court papers, a brand new Galaxy Note 9 ‘became extremely hot’ while in the purse of real estate agent Diane Chung.

Ms Chung was in an elevator in Bayside in New York City when ‘she heard a whistling and screeching sound, and she noticed thick smoke’.

According to the Queens Supreme Court lawsuit, she tried to take the smoking phone out of her bag without burning her fingers.

She says the smoke was so thick she was struggling to see inside the elevator and the device only stopped sizzling when it was plunged into a bucket of water.

Ms Chung is seeking unspecified damages and a restraining order barring the sales of any more Galaxy Notes 9s.

‘We have not received any reports of similar incidents involving a Galaxy Note 9 device and we are investigating the matter,’ a Samsung spokesman told NY Post.

MailOnline has contacted Samsung for comment. 

The electronics maker has been hit with multiple lawsuits following reports that other smartphone models are plagued with similar battery issues, including the Galaxy S6, S7 Edge and Note 5.

Last year cases in three US states claimed that Samsung was aware of the battery issues and fire hazards for years, but opted not to inform its customers. 

Approximately 112 Galaxy Note 7 fires were reported worldwide within a month of the smartphone’s launch in August 2016.

Five months later, the Samsung announced an official recall of all the 2.5 million devices sold – blaming the incidents on ‘irregularly sized batteries’.

Samsung has been hit with multiple lawsuits following reports that other smartphone models are plagued with similar battery issues ¿ including the Galaxy S6, S7 Edge (pictured)

Samsung has been hit with multiple lawsuits following reports that other smartphone models are plagued with similar battery issues – including the Galaxy S6, S7 Edge (pictured)

Last year Dale Holzworth from Massachusetts filed a class action lawsuit that claimed the Galaxy S7 Edge he had purchased last year burst into flames while it sat charging in his son’s bedroom.

The fire allegedly spread to the bed and the melting parts of the phone burnt holes in the carpet.

‘Samsung manufactures and sells smartphones which pose a threat to the safety of consumers,’ read the Samsung class action complaint, which was published by TopClassActions.com.

‘Samsung recalled the Note 7 while leaving other dangerous products in the marketplace. Unfortunately, the problem is not limited to the Note 7.’

He continued to claim that other Samsung smartphone owners have experienced similar issues since 2011.

Last year Dale Holzworth from Massachusetts filed a class action lawsuit that claimed the Galaxy S7 Edge (pictured) he had purchased last year burst into flames

Last year Dale Holzworth from Massachusetts filed a class action lawsuit that claimed the Galaxy S7 Edge (pictured) he had purchased last year burst into flames

But despite knowing the risks, the firm proceeded to increase the size of the battery, even though it knew that was the cause behind the fires, Holzworth stated in the complaint.

The lawsuit has also stated that Samsung’s solution was to use a ‘thermal spreading’, which according to the firm, the thermal spreader it designed was ‘unlike conventional thermal spread technology’.

‘Samsung’s team responsible for designing the system further stated that ‘due to the spatial limits of smartphones, the cooling system’s cooling capacity alone is not enough to cool the device,’ explained the plaintiff.

‘We need to calculate the amount of electric current and optimize the heat control algorithm to minimize occurring heat.’

‘In other words, the new thermal spreader hardware controls the heat more effectively but the software heat-control algorithm must be made compatible to ensure best performance.’  

WHAT WAS THE GALAXY NOTE 7 DISASTER?

Samsung blamed two separate battery issues for the fires that hit its flagship Galaxy Note 7 device in 2016, as it sought to draw a line under the humiliating recall.

The world’s biggest smartphone maker was forced to discontinue the smartphone, originally intended to compete with Apple’s iPhone, after a chaotic recall that saw replacement devices also catching fire.

The fiasco cost the South Korean company $5.3 billion (£4.2 billion) in lost profit and reputational damage. 

Samsung blamed two separate battery issues for the fires that hit its flagship Galaxy Note 7 device in 2016, as it sought to draw a line under the humiliating recall.

Samsung blamed two separate battery issues for the fires that hit its flagship Galaxy Note 7 device in 2016, as it sought to draw a line under the humiliating recall.

The first issue was that the battery components in the Galaxy Note 7 did not fit in the battery’s casing.

This caused the battery cell’s upper right corner to be crimped by the casing.

The second round affected the devices sent to replace the original faulty phones.

These were caused by manufacturing issues, including poor welding at the battery manufacturer.

 

 




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