How to get rid of moths in your house – top tips for removing moths from clothes & carpets

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Many homeowners have come into contact with a moth hiding away in their wardrobe or food items. According to the British Pest Control Association, there are roughly 165,000 species in the world, and many species of moths are household pests. The tiny insects enter the home easily through doors or windows. And although small – they tend to be around 2mm, however, can be as large as 300mm across – once in the house, these destructive pests can cause serious damage to food and fabrics. So, how can homeowners get rid of them? It’s important to identify what types of moths have made their way in. Different moths go after different sources of food, so if they’re ‘pantry moths’ they will probably be found wriggling in cereals, and if they’re ‘clothes moths’, holes in wooly cardigans or patches in the carpet will be a clear indicator.

Deep clean

Once the issue has been identified, throw out infected materials. Unfortunately, the best way of stopping a moth infestation is by throwing out all contaminated goods, especially food.

Clear cupboards and throw out the bin bags immediately, then disinfect the surfaces with an anti-bacterial spray. There are many over the counter products that can be bought specifically for killing moths.

For dealing with clothes moths, put affected clothing on a hot wash. Dry cleaning is also known to debug garments.

Vacuum clean

Once the rubbish has been thrown out, hoover everything. Speaking to the Telegraph, Stuart Hine, an insect expert at the Natural History Museum, said: “Vacuum cleaners are moths’ worst enemies.

“They don’t like disturbance, so open up your cupboards once a month and shake everything out. Do the same with carpets – move furniture and clean under wardrobes and tables.”

It’s important to remember to dispose of the vacuum bag immediately, as it may contain eggs, which is the biggest problem when trying to get rid of house moths.

Moths can breed at an alarming rate. Moths like to lay their eggs in dark, quiet places where they are likely to be undisturbed, so being thorough with cleaning can prevent moths from hatching.

Natural remedies

Along with mothballs, many other techniques exist to rid a home of these fabric-munching pests, including natural remedies such as camphor wood, bay leaves, lavender and placing conkers in areas at risk.

While these won’t stop the larvae already nesting in a wardrobe, they will target the fully-grown moths, preventing mating and further multiplication.

Seal everything

While sprays can prevent moths, a lot are known to contain chemicals which may cause other health risks. Instead, try sealing clothing in air tight vacuum bags.

The same technique can be used in food cupboards by using storage containers to make it difficult for moths to get into packaging.

If you find that the moth problem isn’t clearing up, it may be best to call in a professional pest control operator. They’ll be able to identify the problem and help with widespread infestations or hard-to-clean items, such as moth infested rugs.

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