First ever clear picture of Neil Armstrong’s face during famous moonwalk is uncovered 50 years on

0
30


NEIL Armstrong was the reluctant American hero who became one of the most famous people in the universe when he set foot on the moon.

But despite being the first ever moonwalker, there are very few clear shots of him on the lunar surface because he was the one taking the photos.

The first ever clear shot of Neil Armstrong's face while he was walking on the moon has been uncovered by an amateur British photographer
ANDY SAUNDERS/NASA

The first ever clear shot of Neil Armstrong’s face while he was walking on the moon has been uncovered by an amateur British photographer[/caption]

Neil Armstrong in 1968, the year before his Moon trip
Astronaut Neil Armstrong in 1969, the year of his trip to the moon
WARNING: Use of this image is subject to the terms of use of BBC Pictures' Digital Picture

Now, 50 years on from the Apollo 11 landing, an amateur British photographer has uncovered the first ever picture showing Armstrong’s face while he was walking on the moon.

Andy Saunders, 45, noticed that his expression was visible in three frames of high definition video footage released by Nasa.

So he merged the shots together to reveal the detailed image which has been hailed by scientists as “poignant” and “touching”.

The moonwalkers usually kept their visors down to avoid the glare of the sun.

But Neil appears to have lifted his shield for better visibility for a few minutes while in the shadow of the landing module.

It is thought his expression was captured shortly after famously declaring: “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”.

Astronomy expert Dr Dan Brown, of Nottingham Trent University, told The Telegraph: “Seeing a face makes this picture even more complete and real.

“Being now able to bring this into the imagery captured during the Apollo missions is really magical and touching.”

Neil Armstrong and "Buzz" Aldrin deploy the US flag on the lunar surface during the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission
Neil Armstrong and ‘Buzz’ Aldrin deploy the US flag on the lunar surface during the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission
ImageForum

Dr Robert Massey, of the Royal Astronomical Society, added that the image is a reminder of how camera-shy Neil Armstrong was compared to Aldrin.

“Armstrong really was a quiet hero, which is apparent as this is the only image we have of his face when on the Moon. It’s an important record of a really crucial moment in the mission.”

Shunning the limelight, Armstrong always believed he was just doing his job.

After leaving Nasa he made a name for himself in the world of academia.

He was Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Cincinnati between 1971 and 1979.

From 1982 to 1992, he was chairman of Computing Technologies for Aviation, Inc., Charlottesville, in Virginia.

Armstrong became the first human to step on the moon on July 20, 1969.

He was commander of Apollo 11 and went into space with Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin and command module pilot Michael Collins.

Armstrong died aged 82 in Cincinnati in Ohio, US, on August 25, 2012, after developing complications having undergone heart bypass surgery because he had blocked arteries.

He was buried at sea because he had been a navy pilot.

A footprint left by the astronauts of the Apollo 11 mission lies on the surface of the moon in this July 20, 1969, file photo
A footprint left by the astronauts of the Apollo 11 mission lies on the surface of the moon in this July 20, 1969, file photo

//players.brightcove.net/5067014667001/default_default/index.min.js


We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.


 

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here