eBay: ‘Rare’ Benjamin Bunny 50p coin selling for £400 – why? Seller makes BIZARRE claim

eBay: ‘Rare’ Benjamin Bunny 50p coin selling for £400 – why? Seller makes BIZARRE claim

Coins can be found selling for a huge amount of money online, with this including some listings on eBay. As with any pricey purchase, it could be a

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Coins can be found selling for a huge amount of money online, with this including some listings on eBay. As with any pricey purchase, it could be a good idea to carry out research into the item before a buyer commits themselves to the sale. And, considering the astounding price tag of this 50p coin, seeking advice from a coin expert could certainly prove handy. This Benjamin Bunny 50p coin has currently got a starting price of £400 – which includes free standard delivery.

So, why is this coin listed for such a huge amount, and will anyone really be willing to shell out so much money?

Beside photos of the 2017 coin, the seller, “milapookie123”, has written: “Collectors rare 2017 Benjamin Bunny 50p coin.”

They have gone on to explain that it is from the commemorative Beatrice Potter collection, insisting it’s a “beautiful rare coin at a very reasonable price”.

Also in the description, the eBay user has claimed that it is rated at nine in terms of scarcity.

What’s more, they added: “These collectors coins are currently worth £550 but can sell for over £700.”

However, this seems rather unusual, considering a strikingly similar 50 pence piece is available on the Royal Mint website.

The Brilliant Uncirculated version, which is the final coin in the Beatrix Potter 2017 collection, is selling for £10 on the website.

According to Change Checker, this design of coin, by Emma Noble, has a mintage of 25,000,000.

The website also reports that it comes in at one on the scarcity index – making it common.

It’s worth pointing out that it’s up to the buyer how much they want to spend, and sometimes coins can be more collectable than others for an array of reasons.

However, the publication Spend it? Save it? What should you do? has issued a warning about buying coins online.

In the guide, it is explained that it’s up to the seller when it comes to how much they list the item for.

And, by putting some coins up for sale for a whopping amount of money, lower priced pieces can seem like much better value.

However, some of these listings are still overpriced – so buyers still pay over the odds.

This week, the Royal Mint unveiled their new 50p coin.

The Gruffalo 50 pence piece celebrates the 20th anniversary of the children’s book character – but their availability is limited.

Which are the rarest £1, £2, 50p, 20p, 10p and 2p coins?

Rarest £2 coins

The rarest £2 coin is the 2002 Commonwealth Games NI coin with 485,500 in circulation. This is followed by the 2002 Commonwealth Games Wales which has 588,500 in circulation.

Next up is the 2015 Navy, and there are 650,000 in circulation.

Rarest £1 coins

The most rare £1 coins are all part of a series celebrating the British capitals.

The rarest of these is the 2011 Edinburgh coin, with 935,000 in circulation. Of the 2011 Cardiff coins there are 1,615,000 in circulation, while the 2010 London coin has 2,635,000 in circulation.

Rarest 50p coin

The rarest 50p coin is the Kew Gardens coin, which is also the rarest coin in circulation. It there were only 210,000 minted.

The football Olympic 50p coin has 1,125,500 in circulation, and the wrestling coin has 1,129,500 in circulation.

It is not so easy to evaluate the rarest 20p coins, 10p coins and even 2p coins as exact circulation figures are not known.

However, various versions of the coins are known to sell for large sums.

These include the dateless 20ps, which are actually part of a run from 2008. There may be between 50,000 and 200,000 of these coins in circulation.

The 1983 ‘New Pence’ 2p coin can also sell for a huge sum, up to £650.

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