Aztec BOMBSHELL: How archaeologist made ‘INCREDIBLE’ 500-year-old discovery in basement

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The Aztecs were a Mesoamerican culture that flourished in central Mexico from around 1300 to 1521. This community is of great interest to historians, due to their diverse background and culture. However, one discovery made 600ft from the Templo Mayor site of Mexico City sheds new light on how its rulers projected power.

Archaeologist Raul Barrera dug into the basement of an old house, only to be greeted by a rack of human skulls, known as a tzompantli.

The skulls were affixed to the top of wooden poles and cemented together using a mixture of materials to create the wall feature.

The amazing discovery was revealed during Morgan Freeman’s Netflix show “The Story of God”.

However, Mr Freeman, 81, revealed it was shockingly not the skulls of rivals.

He said in 2017: “A recent chilling archaeological discovery was found in the basement of an old house.

“Here, Raul Barrera unearthed remains of a rack of human skulls over a hundred feet long. 

“As brutal as it seems to us now, the Aztecs saw human sacrifice as vital.

“Without human blood, they believed the sun would lose power, crops would fail.

“Without the power drawn of a few, all life would come to an end. 

A translator for Mr Barrara revealed: “We are only about 600ft away from Templo Mayor.

“We discovered a wall made of skulls, joined by limestone and it is associated, or is part of, the skull rack of the great tzompantli of the Aztecs. 

“It is incredible and it has been right here for 500 years. 

“What the Aztecs believed was if they stopped doing sacrifices, it would mark the end of the world.”

The find comes after a secret Aztec temple was discovered inside an ancient Mexican pyramid. 

Incredibly, the amazing find was only unearthed after the earthquake which struck Mexico in 2017 damaged the pyramid in Morelos state, 43 miles south of Mexico City.

The ancient shrine predates the 13th-century Teopanzolco pyramid by several hundred years, say archaeologists. 

It was only discovered when scientists from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) used a radar to check for structural damage to the pyramid.

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