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Woman, 21, forced to have leg amputated after routine operation on ingrowing toenail sparked deadly infection

A WOMAN of 21 opted to have her leg amputated when she was struck by a deadly infection following an operation on an ingrowing toenail. Hannah Moore shelled out £5,000 for the surgery two years ago…

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A WOMAN of 21 opted to have her leg amputated when she was struck by a deadly infection following an operation on an ingrowing toenail.

Hannah Moore shelled out £5,000 for the surgery two years ago after the NHS refused to pay for it.

 Hannah Moore had her leg amputated after she was struck by a deadly infectionCaters News Agency Hannah Moore had her leg amputated after she was struck by a deadly infection

It came after the routine procedure sparked a debilitating condition that confined her to a wheelchair for four years.

But, she has since triumphed against adversity – becoming a champion triathlete.

And she now has her sights set on the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics after being fitted with a £10,000 revolutionary prosthetic cycling leg.

Hannah, from Sherborne, Dorset, said "Having my leg amputated was the best decision I've ever made. The things I have achieved I would never have without this operation.

 Hannah has now set her sights on the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics after being fitted with a revolutionary prosthetic legBournemouth News Hannah has now set her sights on the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics after being fitted with a revolutionary prosthetic leg

"I am a British champion and now my dream is to compete in Tokyo.

"The custom-made cycling leg is designed to be aerodynamic.

"It is a lot lighter than the leg I was previously using and because it attaches to the pedal there is a lot more power transfer.

"With my normal leg there is a lot of movement in it so some of the power gets lost.

Bournemouth News

"It feels amazing, really different, so much more comfortable and I have so much more balance going around corners."

Six years ago Hannah was a 15-year-old national karate champion when she underwent a routine procedure for an ingrowing toenail.

However, it triggered a rare, debilitating condition called Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) which blighted her life for the next four years – leaving her suffering from sepsis and wheelchair-bound.

Against NHS advice Hannah then went private in July 2016 to have her right leg removed below the knee.

 Hannah was left suffering from sepsis after a routine toenail operation went wrong Hannah was left suffering from sepsis after a routine toenail operation went wrong

The gamble paid off as the Yeovil College student is no longer in pain and the fittest she has been in her life.

Last August she became the British PTS4 Paratriathlon Champion and she will begin a sports and exercise degree at Loughborough University later this year.

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How to say Happy Passover in Yiddish and Hebrew and what’s the correct greeting to mark Pesach Sheni?

PASSOVER may have come to an end on April 7 but the second Passover, Pesach Sheni, is right around the corner on April 28. If you want to wish one of your Jewish friends a happy holiday, how do you…

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PASSOVER may have come to an end on April 7 but the second Passover, Pesach Sheni, is right around the corner on April 28.

If you want to wish one of your Jewish friends a happy holiday, how do you go about it? Here's the lowdown.

 Jews celebrate the Feast of Passover (Pesach in Hebrew) to commemorate the liberation of the Children of Israel who were led out of Egypt by MosesGetty Images – Getty Jews celebrate the Feast of Passover (Pesach in Hebrew) to commemorate the liberation of the Children of Israel who were led out of Egypt by Moses

How to say happy Passover in Hebrew and Yiddish

The most standard Hebrew greeting, which is acceptable during any Jewish festival, is "chag sameach".

Translated, "chag" means Jewish holiday, while "sameach" means happy – so it simply means "happy holiday".

Sameach is derived from the Hebrew word "simcha" which means celebration – a word often used by Jewish people at Barmitzvahs and Batmitzvah parties as well as weddings and other celebrations.

However, if you really want to impress your Jewish mates, you could throw in a couple more words and say: "Chag Pesach kasher vesame' ach", which means "have a happy and kosher Passover.

In Yiddish, the acceptable way to greet Jewish pals is "a koshern un freilichen Pesach".

But if this proves too much of a mouthful, you can go with "zissen Pesach", which means: "Have a sweet Passover."

What is Pesach Sheni and how is it celebrated?

Pesach Sheni, also known as the "second chance holiday" falls exactly one month after 14 Nisan, the day before Passover.

This year, this will begin on Saturday, April 28 and end on Sunday, April 29.

The date serves as a second opportunity for those who didn't bring an offering in the weeks before.

Just like the April festival, the Jewish calendar date is celebrated by the eating of matzah, in remembrance of the Passover offering.

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When is Ramadan 2018, when does the festival start and end and why do Muslims fast?

RAMADAN is observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting to commemorate “the best of times”. It celebrates the first time the Quran was revealed to Muhammad, according to Islamic …

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RAMADAN is observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting to commemorate "the best of times".

It celebrates the first time the Quran was revealed to Muhammad, according to Islamic belief – but what else do we know about the festival?

 A group of people observing Ramadan break fast togetherAP:Associated Press A group of people observing Ramadan break fast together

When is Ramadan 2018?

Ramadan in 2018 will begin in the evening of May 15, and will end in the evening of June 14.

The beginning and end are determined by the lunar Islamic calendar.

Hilal, the crescent, is usually a day or more after the astronomical new moon.

The "night of power" or "night of decree" is considered the holiest night of the year, as Muslims believe the first revelation of the Quran was sent down to Muhammad on this night.

It is thought to have occurred on an odd-numbered night during the last 10 days of Ramadan – the 21, 23, 25, 27 or 29th.

The holiday of Eid as-Fitr marks the end of Ramadan and the beginning of the next lunar month.

What happens during Ramadan?

The word Ramadan comes from the Arabic root ramiḍa or ar-ramaḍ, which means scorching heat or dryness.

Fasting is obligatory for adult Muslims, except those who are suffering from an illness, travelling, are elderly, pregnant, breastfeeding, diabetic, chronically ill or menstruating.

Muslims also engage in increased prayer and charity during Ramadan.

Ramadan is also a month where Muslims try to practice increased self-discipline.

As well as fasting – abstaining from eating and drinking – Muslims are encouraged to read the entire Quran throughout the month, before the holy festival of Eid-al-Fitr.

 People do not eat or drink during daylight hours as they observe RamadanReuters People do not eat or drink during daylight hours as they observe Ramadan

Why do Muslims fast during Ramadan?

Ramadan is seen as a time of spiritual reflection, improvement and increased devotion and worship.

Muslims are expected to put more effort into following the teachings of Islam and this includes fasting – which teaches people how to be more self-disciplined and have empathy for those less fortunate.

The pre-dawn meal before the fast is called the suhur, while the meal at sunset that breaks the fast is the iftar.

In addition to abstaining from eating and drinking, Muslims also increase restraint, such as abstaining from sexual relations.

The act of fasting is said to cleanse the soul by freeing it from worldly activities, in addition to abolition of past sins.

Dates usually break the fast at sundown, as is tradition.

After that the usual practice is to adjourn for prayer and then the main meal is served.

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Hans Asperger ‘helped Nazis Murder Dozens Of Disabled Kids During World War Two’ Before He Identified Autism

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THE respected autism doctor Hans Asperger actually helped Nazis murder dozens of disabled children, new documents reveal.

Asperger was the first psychiatrist to chronicle the form of high-functioning autism and has won a reputation for his leading work on “autistic psychopathy” – a syndrome which would later be named after him.

Dr Hans Asperger with a patient. He was the first to chronicle the condition

But new research shows the prestigious doctor actively helped and cooperated with the murderous regime as part of Adolf Hitler’s euthanasia programme.

Asperger is said to have referred disabled children to the notorious Am Spiegelgrund clinic in Vienna, where they were systematically killed.

An estimated 789 children are believed to have been culled at the clinic in Vienna, mainly by lethal injection or gassing.

Others died from disease and starvation or were subjected to horrendous medical experiments.

Herta Schreiber, three, died in hospital

Paediatrician Hans Asperger is alleged to have sent helpless disabled children to their deaths in a euthanasia clinic

“Aktion T4”, the horrific euthanasia programme personally authorised by Adolf Hitler, set out to cull the incurable and severely disabled.

Up to 300,000 victims, including children, were exterminated at clinics in Germany, Austria, Poland and the Czech Republic between 1939 and 1945.

The chilling discovery was made by Herwig Czech from the Medical University of Vienna, who set out the claims against Prof Asperger after trawling through unexamined Nazi documents from the Nazi era including personnel files and patient records.

Czech believes Asperger did the Nazis’ bidding to ingratiate himself with the regime, and was complicit in the fate of the vulnerable children.

Not known, clear with picture desk Dr Hans Asperger at the Children’s Clinic of the University of Vienna Hospital c.1940

The findings suggest that Asperger actively cooperated with the Nazi Regime up until 1945

He said: “These findings about Hans Asperger are the result of many years of careful research in the archives.

“What emerges is that Asperger successfully sought to accommodate himself to the Nazi regime and was rewarded with career opportunities in return”.

The claims had reached the UK by 1941, when Royal Air Force dropped leaflets in Vienna stating that Dr Erwin Jekelius, director of the Steinhof hospital and Am Spiegelgrund was responsible for “the systematic murder of patients”.

Dr Czech, says three-year-old Herta Schreiber was sent to her death, after being diagnosed as suffering “severe personality disorder”, “idiocy” and “seizures”.

It is claimed Asperger referred vulnerable children to the notorious Am Spiegelrund death clinic

Asperger’s reputation as a leading paediatrician has come under question What is Asperger syndrome?

The syndrome, sometimes referred to just as ‘Asperger’s’, is a  lifelong developmental disability that affects how people perceive the world and interact with others.

 

The illness, which comes under the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) umbrella, is not an illness or disease and cannot be ‘cured’, but is a life-long condition.

 

People with Asperger syndrome are of average or above average intelligence. They don’t have the learning disabilities that many autistic people have but may have difficulties understanding and processing language.

 

It is not known how many people suffer from Asperger’s, though earlier estimates have suggested about 1 in 500 people were affected.

Asperger said: “The child must be an unbearable burden to the mother, who has to care for five healthy children” and recommended “permanent placement at Spiegelgrund”.

Dr Czech claims that “permanent placement” could have been a “euphemism for murder”.

The girl’s mother also appeared to be aware of her daughter’s likely fate, with a note saying: “If she cannot be helped, it would be better if she died.”

Herta was admitted on July 1, and died of pneumonia on September 2.

Luca Borghi/Himetop.wikidot.com Pavilion 5 of the Steinhof hospital in Vienna hosts a permanent exhibition about the history of Nazi medical crimes in the Austrian capital, named ‘The war against the inferiors’ Dr Czech said that pneumonia was typically induced at the clinic by administering barbiturates.

Czech’s allegations are part of a broader effort by historians to expose what doctors were doing during the Third Reich.

The allegations are reported in the journal Molecular Autism, whose two editors explained why they support the claims.

One of them, leading British autism expert Professor Simon Baron-Cohen, from Cambridge University,

admitted the findings were “controversial”.

Hans Asperger (1906 – 1980)

Johann ‘Hans’ Friedrich Karl Asperger was an Austrian pediatrician, medical theorist. There have been numerous claims made that he was a Nazi sympathiser.

He is best known for his studies on mental disorders, especially in children. His work was little known until after his death, when his work enjoyed a resurgence in the 1980s.

In 1936 he became a director of the special education section at the university children’s clinic in Vienna in 1932. He married in 1935 and had five children.

As a child, Asperger appears to have shown many features of the condition that is named after him. He was described as a lonely child, who had difficulty making friends but was a talented linguist.

Asperger died before his identification of Asperger’s becmae widely recognised – partly because his work was in German.

One of his Asperger’s patients was Elfriede Jelinek, the Austrian writer and Nobel Prize in Literature laureate.

The first person to use the term ‘Asperger’s Syndrome’ was in a medical paper, published a year after his death in 1980.

But he added: “We believe that it deserves to be published in order to expose the truth about how a medical doctor who, for a long time, was seen as only having made valuable contributions to the field of paediatrics and child psychiatry, was guilty of actively assisting the Nazis in their abhorrent eugenics and euthanasia policies.”

Patient groups are now discussing whether the research could provoke a change in terminology used for Asperger’s Syndrome.

Carol Povey, from the National Autistic Society, said: “We expect these findings to spark a big conversation among the 700,000 autistic people in the UK and their family members, particularly those who identify with the term “Asperger”.

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