Who Eats The Leftovers On Masterchef And The Great British Bake Off And Is The Food Served Cold? Behind The Scenes Secrets Unveiled | The News Amed
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Who Eats The Leftovers On Masterchef And The Great British Bake Off And Is The Food Served Cold? Behind The Scenes Secrets Unveiled

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THERE’S nothing which gets your tummy rumbling quite like a good cooking programme.

But who gets to eat all that tasty looking leftover food on MasterChef and Bake Off, and do Gregg Wallace and John Torode eat the meals cold during judging? Here’s what you need to know…

BBC There’s only so much John Torode and Gregg Wallace can eat, so who gets their leftovers on MasterChef?

Who eats the leftovers on MasterChef?

MasterChef sees amateur, celebrity and professional chefs rustle up some mouthwatering meals.

But, with several dishes to get through, John and Gregg often struggle to wipe the plate clean.

While invention tests see the pantry piled high with fresh food which doesn’t get eaten.

The judges clearly hate waste, often scolding the contestants (especially if they’re professional) for stuff like shoddy filleting which means fish or meat goes to waste.

So what does happen to the leftovers? Back in 2012, Gregg revealed: “What a lot of people want to know is what happens to all the food.

“The raw food gets divided up by the youngsters in the crew — talented young people who’ve just begun their careers and aren’t necessarily earning very much.

“The cooked food is devoured by the filming crew. A lot of them carry their own cutlery!”

While former MasterChef: The Professional semi finalist Louisa Ellis told Birmingham Live: “Food very rarely gets thrown away.

“There’s always someone available to eat the delicious food – except if the chefs have messed up and food is under or overcooked and inedible.”

Sounds like a decent staff lunch to us.

BBC The younger staff members get a share of the fresh food in the pantry, while the film crew tuck into the main meals

Who eats the leftovers on The Great British Bake Off?

The Bake Off grand finale sees all the finalists’ friends and family tuck into their delicious showstoppers.

But who eats the leftover cake, biscuits, bread and other goodies throughout the rest of the series – after Paul Hollywood and Prue Leith have filled their boots?

Well, unlike MasterChef, the first pick of leftovers goes to the bakers themselves.

The show’s Chief Home Economist Faenia Moore previously told BBC Good Food: “It’s important for the bakers to eat what they’ve slaved over, so after each challenge I make up a ‘baker’s basket’ to go to their lunchroom.

“Then any leftovers go to the crew lunch. Everyone gets quite excited.”

PA:Press Association The Bake Off contestants get the first pick of their own cakes – but also ‘run’ to get a taste of the best ones by their competitors

While former contestant Ali told the Birmingham Mail: “The cameramen literally stand there with forks in their back pockets, waiting to swoop as soon as filming stops.”

But it’s not just the crew who are rushing to get a bite of the action.

Chetna Makan, from the 2014 series, told Digital Spy: “It’s not just the cameramen who swarm over the food, we (the other contestants) definitely do it too.

“We all run to the food made by whoever got the most compliments. Literally, everybody runs, nearly knocking each other over to have a taste.”

While Prue’s neighbours must have the fanciest pigswill in Britain, after the judge told The Telegraph she feeds the animals Bake Off leftovers.

She said: “I used to bring them all home from Bake Off in a big box, all the bits. My neighbour keeps pigs, so these pigs got the most amazing cakes and bread.”

Channel 4 While Prue Leith actually fed last year’s leftovers to her neighbour’s PIGS

Is the food on MasterChef served cold?

We’ve seen Gregg and John gleefully tuck into many a dinner on MasterChef, but is that food really as appetising as the cameramen make it look?

The flavours are sure to be delicious, but it may taste odd to those of us who like meals hot.

Food

You Can Now Buy Pre-mixed Wkd Cocktails – And They’re Only £1.60 In Tesco

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WKD is trying to cash in on the warm weather with their new drink.

The drinks brand, via Tesco, is now selling new pre-mixed cocktails in a tin.

Tesco People are talking about the new flavours

There are three flavours to chose from Cheeky V – port (blue and lemonade), Oh Schnapp – peach schnapps (berry and orange) and Passionista – rum (passion fruit and lemonade).

All the cocktails are mixed with WKD to give them a sizzling taste.

Each can costs £1.60.

On Instagram karlachristie tagged her mate brooke10994 in a post and said: “There ya go sorted for Saturday.”

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Food

You Can Now Buy Pre-mixed Wkd Cocktails

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on

AS the summer gets ever closer – and the weather hopefully gets hotter, WKD has got things covered.

The drinks brand, via Tesco, is now selling delicious-sounding new pre-mixed cocktails in a tin.

Tesco People love the idea of the new flavours

There are three flavours to chose from Cheeky V – port (blue and lemonade), Oh Schnapp – peach schnapps (berry and orange) and Passionista – rum (passion fruit and lemonade).

All the cocktails are mixed with WKD to give them a sizzling taste.

And people have reacted with delight.

On Instagram karlachristie tagged her mate brooke10994 in a post and said: “There ya go sorted for Saturday.”

Tesco The drinks are available at Tesco

People discussed their favourite flavour.

dottydot1980 said: “Would love to try Passionista.”

ashleigh.smith18 added: “Would love to try the peach snaps first as I think it looks amazing but so do all they all as all wkd is :)”

And, amazingly, each can is just £1.60 each.

Tesco even has a deal on at the moment where you can buy four cans and get one free – so there is no excuse not to try them all.

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Anzac Day 2018 – How To Make Anzac Biscuits And What Is The History Of The Traditional Australian Recipe?

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ANZAC biscuits are a traditional Australian sweet are associated with Anzac Day, but are eaten all year round.

Anzac (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) Day has been held on April 25 for the more than a century.

Getty – Contributor Anzac Day commemorates the First World War

How do you make Anzac biscuits?

The biscuits are made from very simple ingredients, and don’t contain egg.

It is said when they were being widely made around the First World War, eggs were scarce so the recipe today reflects what was available at the time.

And the ingredients allowed them to be transported over long distances without spoiling.

The golden biscuits vary from crispy to chewy, and are sold in most stores across Australia and New Zealand.

Getty – Contributor Anzac stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps

Making them yourself gives you not only warm and fresh biscuits, but you have the satisfaction of eating something home-made.

Anzac biscuits are made of porridge oats, desiccated coconut, plain flour, caster sugar, butter, golden syrup and bicarbonate of soda.

BBC Good Food shared a recipe, where they say to preheat the oven to 180c/fan or 160/gas 4.

Recipe for Anzac biscuits

85g porridge oat 85g desiccated coconut 100g plain flour 100g caster sugar 100g butter, plus extra butter for greasing 1 tbsp golden syrup 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda Melt the butter in a small pan and add the golden syrup. Add the bicarbonate of soda to 2 tbsp of boiling water, then stir the syrup mixture into the butter mixture. Put the oats, coconut and flour into a bowl, and make a well in the middle Pour in the syrup / butter mixture, and stir the ingredients in.

Getty – Contributor Anzac Day is on April 25 every year On a buttered baking sheet scoop out the mixture in small amounts roughly 1cm apart. Bake in batches for around 8-10 mins then transfer to a wire rack to cool.

What’s the history of Anzac biscuits?

Standing for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, it commemorates the day Australian and New Zealand forces landed at Gallipoli, Turkey, during the First World War.

It remembers their sacrifice as the 1915 Gallipoli landing, also referred to as the battle of Anzac Cove, resulted in a great loss of life.

Anzac Day was made official on April 25 the following year, 1916.

It initially started as a day to remember the soldiers who died in that conflict, but it was later expanded to all Australian and New Zealand soldiers who served in all war and peacekeeping operations, past and present.

Both countries observe this national day, and as well as eating the biscuits also drink ‘gunfire coffee’, coffee with rum in it, and play card game two-up.

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