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The Latest Shaun White Sex Assault Allegations Are Gossip

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The Latest on the Pyeongchang Olympics (all times local):

5:30 p.m.

Shaun White has dismissed the sexual assault allegations made against him in a 2016 lawsuit as “gossip.”

White won his third Olympic gold medal Wednesday in the men’s halfpipe, then was criticized on social media and questioned in a press conference about allegations made in a lawsuit by a former drummer in White’s rock band.

The woman says White sexually harassed and refused to pay her. The lawsuit was settled last May.

White was asked in a media conference if the lawsuit might tarnish his reputation.

He says, “I’m here to talk about the Olympics, not gossip and stuff.” He adds, “I don’t think so.”

Reporters attempted to follow up about the lawsuit, but the conference moderator shot them down. White rushed off stage as reporters questioned him about the allegations following the conference.

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5:10 p.m.

The Olympic women’s individual biathlon has been postponed due to strong winds hitting the Alpensia Biathlon Center.

Forecasts are predicting gusts of more than 15 mph Wednesday night, making it difficult for competitors to shoot their rifles.

The event has been moved to Thursday, starting ahead of the men’s individual biathlon.

Wind has been a problem throughout the Pyeongchang Olympic Games. The women’s slalom was also canceled Wednesday and spectators were asked to evacuate the Olympic Park in the coastal city of Gangneung because it was so gusty. The men’s downhill and women’s giant slalom have also had to be postponed.

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4:20 p.m.

There are sports rivalries, and then there’s Korea versus Japan. The fierce grudges over historical persecution cannot be untwined from the sports for many Koreans, and these emotions will be front and center Wednesday when a combined team of North and South Koreans plays regional power Japan in women’s hockey.

Both have yet to win a game these Olympics. Both desperately want that win to come against their loathed rival.

South Korean forward Choi Ji-yeon says defeating Japan would bring “much happiness” to the Korean people because of the “bad things that happened with Japan in the past.”

The Korean team has had some tough games, and Japan is the favorite. Korea lost 8-0 to Switzerland on Saturday, and then 8-0 to Sweden on Monday. After that game, Korean players vowed redemption in their last preliminary round match against Japan.

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4:15 p.m.

American ski racer Tommy Biesemeyer will miss the men’s downhill Thursday after hurting his right ankle while training. The U.S. ski team said Wednesday he was taken to a local clinic to receive treatment and was released.

Ryan Cochran-Siegle will take his place in the race.

Biesemeyer said in a statement: “You are supposed to be optimistic in times like these and say something like, ‘I will come back stronger than ever.’ But I just can’t bring myself to do it. I am honored to have been named to Team USA and walking in the Opening Ceremony is a moment I’ll never forget.”

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3:55 p.m.

Officials are asking spectators to evacuate the Olympic Park in the coastal city of Gangneung and take shelter indoors because of strong winds.

An announcement in Korean and English advises fans to go inside for safety Wednesday afternoon. Workers are disassembling tents around the park.

Volunteers are also using bullhorns to tell fans to go inside. Many were queued up to go inside the Samsung building near the hockey arena.

Winds are blowing steadily around 23 mph (37 kph) with stiffer gusts rattling and shaking the giant tent anchored with metal beams in Gangneung.

A media work tent was closed because of the gusting winds ahead of a women’s hockey game between Japan and Korea.

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3:40 p.m.

American Emily Sweeney is recovering from a frightening crash that knocked her out of the final run of the Pyeongchang Olympic women’s luge competition.

Sweeney was still experiencing back pain after Tuesday’s crash, and she was being monitored by USA Luge’s medical staff. USA Luge says Sweeney is doing well and her parents are visiting with her in the Athletes’ Village.

The Pyeongchang Games were Sweeney’s first Olympics. Sweeney lost control around a curve considered the track’s most treacherous spot, then careened through several more turns before crashing.

The plan is for Sweeney to continue being checked regularly by doctors for the next few days. USA Luge says, “Further steps will be taken, if necessary.”

Sweeney doesn’t have any other events scheduled at the Olympics.

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3:20 p.m.

The winds are so strong at the Pyeongchang Olympics that officials are closing the media work tent outside the Kwandong Hockey Center ahead of a game between Japan and Korea.

An official asked reporters and photographers to move to work locations inside the hockey rink Wednesday because the media tent was being closed.

Winds are blowing steadily around 23 mph (37 kph) with stiffer gusts rattling and shaking the giant tent anchored with metal beams in Gangneung.

A heavy contingent of media is at the Kwandong Hockey Center for the women’s hockey game between Japan and Korea. The two countries have a long and bitter history.

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3 p.m.

Switzerland has edged Sweden 2-1 to take the top spot in Group B of women’s hockey at the Pyeongchang Olympics.

The win ensures Switzerland, the 2014 bronze medalist, will face either Finland or the Russians on Saturday in the quarterfinals.

Phoebe Staenz scored the game-winner at 11:28 of the third period. Alina Muller also had a goal and an assist, and Christine Meier had two assists. Goalie Florence Schelling made 33 saves for an Olympic record with her ninth career win, breaking a tie with Canada’s Kim St. Pierre.

Muller gave Switzerland a 1-0 lead with a power-play goal at 13:51 of the second period for her tournament-best sixth goal.

Sweden, which hasn’t medaled since taking silver in 2006 at Turin, tied it with Anna Borgqvist’s power-play goal at 7:35 of the third.

Staenz scored on the power-play to keep the Swiss undefeated. They beat Sweden to win bronze in 2014.

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2:30 p.m.

Next stop is Tokyo in 2020 for the oompah band Kleintje Pils, aka “the Dutch giants on clogs” at the Pyeongchang Games.

It will be full circle if they make it to the Summer Games in two years’ time. The brass band, known for their stirring renditions of classics like Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline,” started out at the 1998 Nagano Games in Japan.

The Dutch already reign supreme on the ice at the speedskating oval and on Wednesday, Kleintje Pils, which translates to “Small Beer,” took the infield again.

“Just before leaving for Korea, we studied the song ‘Gangnam Style’ and it has become our biggest hit here,” said Ruud Bakker, who wields a bass drum. “Koreans may be subdued, but this gets them going.”

Decked out in their orange-striped shirts, casual pants and wooden shoes, Kleintje Pils had its first performance at a hockey match. “The fans are different. They raised the roof,” said Bakker.

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1:55 p.m.

The Chinese pair of Sui Wenjing and Han Cong led Russian skaters Evgenia Tarasova and Vladimir Morozov by less than a point after the short program in the Pyeongchang Olympics.

Sui and Han scored a season-best 82.39 points Wednesday to a breathtaking, almost ethereal version of the Leonard Cohen song “Hallelujah.” They embraced on their knees as the music came to an end, holding the pose for a moment as the crowd roared its approval.

Tarasova and Morozov scored 81.68 points to a piano concerto by Rachmaninov to keep them in contention heading into Thursday’s free skate.

Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford of Canada were third with 76.82 points. That was less than a point ahead of German favorites Aliona Savchenkno and Bruno Massot.

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12:15 p.m.

Snowboarder Shaun White has won America’s 100th Winter Olympic gold medal, throwing down a spectacular final run in the men’s halfpipe.

The United States is only the second country to win 100 winter golds. It trails Norway, which started Wednesday with 121. Germany is third with 92.

White’s gold was the fourth for the U.S. in Pyeongchang. The others came from snowboarders Red Gerard, Jamie Anderson and Chloe Kim. America has won 14 gold medals in snowboarding since its Olympic debut in 1998, the most of any country.

This is White’s third gold medal and first since 2010. He ranks third among Americans in individual winter gold medals, trailing only speedskaters Bonnie Blair and Eric Heiden, who have five each.

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12:05 p.m.

Snowboarding star Shaun White is a three-time Olympic champion.

The American threw down a spectacular final run in men’s halfpipe to slip by Japan’s Ayumu Hirano. White’s score of 97.75 was a touch better than Hiramo’s 95.25.

The gold medal is the 100th overall gold for the United States in the Winter Olympics, and White is the first American male to win gold at three separate Winter Games.

Australia’s Scotty James took bronze.

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11:50 a.m.

The North Korean pairs team of Ryom Tae Ok and Kim Ju Sink have scored a season-best 69.40 points to briefly move into second place during the short program at the Pyeongchang Olympics.

North Korea’s only pair drew cheers from a large block of uniformly dressed fans for even the most simple of elements in practice. Then, they neatly landed their opening triple twist lift, hit a triple toe and throw triple loop, and were showered afterward with flowers from their fans.

The couple dressed in silver and black and performed to a cover of the Beatles song “A Day in the Life” by English rock guitarist Jeff Beck. They were the 10th among 22 teams to take the ice inside the Gangneung Ice Arena and all the medal contenders were still to come.

Still, their score qualified them for the free skate on Thursday.

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11:40 a.m.

Japan’s Ayumu Hirano has vaulted past Shaun White and into first place in the men’s halfpipe final.

The 19-year-old Hirano put up a score of 95.25 during his second run to edge past White. Hirano washed out in his first run but responded by throwing back-to-back 1440-degree spins during his second run.

White, attempting to become the first American to win gold in three different Winter Olympics, sat down on his second run to remain in second.

White will get one last shot to surpass Ayumu. White will be the final rider to go in the 12-man final.

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11:20 a.m.

Mikaela Shiffrin’s debut at the wind-blown Pyeongchang Olympics has been postponed a second time.

Plans to run the slalom, with Shiffrin defending her title from 2014, have now been shelved, one hour after the original scheduled start at 10:15 a.m. South Korea time. There had been three delays in hope of waiting out the strong gusts. Now the race will be held Friday instead.

Shiffrin already had her giant slalom race postponed Monday at blustery Yongpyong. That race was moved to a Thursday slot, when winds are forecast to ease.

That creates a busy program for the next two days: Two women’s technical races at Yongpyong and two men’s speed races at Jeongseon, 30 miles (50 kilometers) away.

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11:15 a.m.

Harley Windsor became the first indigenous Australian to compete at the Winter Olympics when the pairs skater joined teammate Ekaterina Alexandrovskaya on the ice for their short program.

Windsor and his Russian-born partner were among the first pairs on the ice, and their total of 61.55 points was just off their season’s best. And it also meant a long wait to find out whether they made the cut from 22 pairs to 16 for Thursday’s free skate.

Windsor says he started to “feel a bit nervous” the night before competing, but he was happy with the performance. Both of the 21-year-old Windsor’s parents have Australian Aboriginal roots, and his mother Josie was cheering him on from the stands.

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11:05 a.m.

American snowboarder Shaun White is in the lead after one run in the men’s halfpipe final.

The two-time Olympic champion posted a score of 94.25 during his opening set, throwing a quadruple-twisting turn early in his run to set the benchmark at Phoenix Snow Park.

Australia’s Scotty James is second after putting up a 92.00. American Chase Josey is third. Japanese star Ayumu Hirano washed out on the first run.

Riders get three attempts down the slushy halfpipe, which softened overnight as temperatures rose.

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10:50 a.m.

The figure skating program at the Pyeongchang Olympics has resumed with the short program for the pairs competition, where the German pair of Aliona Savchenko and Bruno Massot are the favorites.

There will probably be just as many eyes on the North Koreans.

Security was a bit tighter at Gangneung Ice Arena on Wednesday than it was for the team event, most likely because of the presence of Ryom Tae Ok and Ju Sink. They were a strong third at last month’s Four Continents and placed 15th at last year’s world championships.

And yes, the North Korean cheerleaders are in attendance.

Other favorites include Russian pair Evgenia Tarasova and Vladimir Morozov, two-time world champs Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford of Canada, and Chinese pair Sui Wenjin and Han Cong.

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10:35 a.m.

Mikaela Shiffrin’s debut at the Pyeongchang Olympics is in a holding pattern with a third delay to the women’s slalom start.

Strong winds, and now some steady falling snow, have put the race at risk on the Rainbow course at Yongpyong.

The opening run is now scheduled to begin at 11:45 a.m. South Korea time on Wednesday (9:45 p.m. on the U.S. East Coast,) after two previous delays of 15 minutes from the original 10:15 a.m. start. The second leg could then start at 2:45 p.m.

Shiffrin, the defending champion, is due to wear the No. 3 starting bib in an 83-racer lineup.

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9:45 a.m.

Katie Couric has apologized for saying that the Dutch are so successful in speed skating because skates have been used as a form of transportation when canals freeze in the Netherlands.

Her remark during the Olympics’ opening ceremony invited some Dutch mockery on social media from people who said the information was outdated. The Netherlands embassy to the United States invited Couric to visit the country to see all of the innovative ways the Dutch get around.

Couric late Monday tweeted her apologies for being on thin ice with her comments.

The veteran anchor said she was trying to salute the country’s historic passion for the sport, but it didn’t come out that way.

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More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org

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Ted Ligety Finishes 15th In Olympic Gs Title Defense

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Ted Ligety knew he hadn’t turned in the best opening run in defense of his Olympic giant slalom title. What he couldn’t tell as he was heading down the hill was just how poorly he’d done.

“I was really surprised when I saw the time,” the 33-year-old American said Sunday after the first of two GS runs at the Pyongyang Alpine Center effectively ended any hopes of another medal in a race he won at the 2014 Sochi Games.

“It didn’t feel like I crushed it,” Ligety said, before adding with a chuckle: “But it didn’t feel 2? seconds bad.”

To be precise, Ligety’s leg of 1 minute, 10.71 seconds put him in 20th place and 2.44 seconds off the pace set by favorite Marcel Hirscher, the Austrian superstar who already won the Alpine combined gold at these Olympics and owns a record six consecutive World Cup overall titles.

“My goal was definitely to try to be challenging for a medal here. I thought that was definitely within my range. Way out of it now,” said Ligety, who finished fifth on Tuesday in the combined, an event he collected gold in at the 2006 Turin Olympics.

He was able to smile and crack a joke when asked to entertain the far-fetched notion that, because anything can happen, perhaps there was still a chance of a high finish at a mountain where he claimed his first career World Cup race victory back in March 2006.

“I mean, maybe if we get some good wind gusts this afternoon and I get a nice tailwind and those guys get a nice headwind — if something funky happens, then maybe I have a hope and a prayer,” Ligety said. “But if it’s a normal, fair race, then this is way too big of a detriment to climb out of.”

All in all, rather unlikely.

The giant slalom has been Ligety’s forte for years.

In addition to the triumph at Sochi, which made him the only U.S. male Alpine skier with two Olympic golds, he won GS world championships in 2011, 2013 and 2015, along with a bronze in the event at the 2009 worlds.

But on Sunday morning in South Korea, he misjudged the course.

“I just thought it would run maybe a little bit more challenging than maybe it did,” Ligety said. “When you do those little slides, it costs you a ton of time. A few too many of those. … Maybe thought the rolls were going to come into play a little bit more, and they were easy. No excuse.”

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Follow Howard Fendrich on Twitter at http://twitter.com/HowardFendrich

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More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org/

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The Latest Swiss Beats Korea 2-0 In Womens Olympic Hockey

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The Latest on the Pyeongchang Olympics (all times local):

3:30 p.m.

Sabrina Zollinger scored on a power play in the first period and Switzerland beat Korea 2-0 in a classification hockey game after routing the Koreans 8-0 in their Olympic opener.

Janine Alder made 19 saves for the shutout Sunday, with Florence Schelling getting a day off after playing in a 6-2 loss to the “Olympic athletes from Russia” in the quarterfinals. Evelina Raselli also scored for the Russians, who won bronze in Sochi.

They will play either Sweden or Japan for their final slotting Tuesday.

Shin So Jung made 51 saves, and the Koreans also killed three of four penalties. Shin gave up a hat trick to Alina Muller in the first period of the opener against Switzerland, and she said she felt a little pressure.

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3:15 p.m.

Patrick Hager scored in regulation and again in a shootout as Germany beat Norway 2-1 to wrap up group play at the Pyeongchang Olympics.

Danny aus den Birken made 28 saves and stopped all three shots he saw in the shootout Sunday.

Germany opened the scoring on a power play in the second when Hager took a pass from Dominik Kahun and stuffed the puck past goaltender Lars Haugen.

Norway tied the game in the third period. Both teams played cautiously in overtime, with Norway failing to capitalize even with nearly two minutes on the man advantage.

Haugen made 36 saves but didn’t stop a shot in the shootout.

Both teams face elimination games Tuesday to get into the quarterfinals.

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2:55 p.m.

Marcel Hirscher has won the Olympic men’s giant slalom. It’s his second gold medal at the Pyeongchang Games.

The 28-year-old Austrian star extended his first-run lead to win by a huge margin of 1.27 seconds over hard-charging Henrik Kristoffersen of Norway. Kristoffersen rose from 10th-fastest in the morning.

Bronze medalist Alexis Pinturault of France finished 1.31 behind Hirscher’s two-run time of 2 minutes, 18.04 seconds.

Hirscher can complete a sweep of three individual titles in his best event, the slalom, which is scheduled for Thursday.

Hirscher also won the Alpine combined Tuesday. Pinturault took silver in that race.

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2:50 p.m.

Norway’s Oystein Braaten has captured the gold medal in ski slopestyle at the Pyeongchang Olympics, far outdistancing American Gus Kenworthy, who failed to land any of his three runs and came in last.

Braaten edged out American Nick Goepper, who added a silver medal to the bronze he won four years ago in Sochi.

Canadian Alex Beaulieu-Marchand took the bronze.

The buzz for this event swirled around Kenworthy, who came out as gay about two years after capturing the silver medal in Russia and has since become a strong voice in the LGBT community.

With family and boyfriend Matt Wilkas watching, Kenworthy bobbled all three runs in the finals. After the last one, he shrugged, shook his head and said, “It’s OK,” to the TV cameras before walking off the course.

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2:30 p.m.

Ticket sales for the Pyeongchang Olympics have exceeded 1 million.

Local organizing committee spokesman Sung Baik-you says the 1 million mark exceeds expectations — 692,443 people attended games venues from Feb. 9 to Feb. 17, and there’s still about a week remaining.

Sung says, “Our target was 1,068,000, so we don’t have many tickets remaining.”

Attendance peaked Saturday, with 146,506 people attending on a holiday for the Lunar New Year. There were long delays in traffic around Pyeongchang on a holiday that usually is the busiest on Korean roads every year, but games organizers weren’t disappointed.

Sung acknowledges traffic jams and bus operation interruptions but says, “Nonetheless, I think we can say we were successful in attracting spectators, so it was a positive thing.”

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2:15 p.m.

Lindsey Vonn has returned to the Olympic Alpine speed race course, where she was fastest in a practice run for Wednesday’s downhill race.

One day after placing sixth in the super-G at Jeongseon, Vonn clocked 1 minute, 41.03 seconds on the 1 ?-mile (2.8-kilometer) downhill course.

The American star was 0.18 seconds faster than Ramona Siebenhofer, with the Austrian’s time recorded despite missing a gate.

Alice McKennis of the United States was third-fastest, 0.53 behind Vonn.

Sunday’s practice was the first of three official training days before Vonn tries to regain the Olympic title she won in 2010.

The surprise super-G gold medalist, Ester Ledecka of the Czech Republic, did not take part in the practice. Ledecka is also due to compete in snowboard parallel giant slalom this week.

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1:30 p.m.

Russian officials have a store of uniforms ready if their team is formally reinstated for the Pyeongchang Olympics closing ceremony.

The head of the delegation of “Olympic Athletes from Russia” Stanislav Pozdnyakov, wouldn’t say where the uniforms are being stored, but says “as regards the closing ceremony, we’re ready for any development, including with extra uniforms.”

Russian athletes in Pyeongchang have been required to compete under the Olympic flag in neutral uniforms as punishment for Russian doping at the 2014 Games in Sochi.

The International Olympic Committee says it could allow them to attend the closing ceremony in Team Russia uniforms under the Russian flag if the team keeps to its IOC-mandated status during the competitions. A decision is expected Saturday, the day before the ceremony.

Pozdnyakov declines to say where the equipment is being kept, but says “if we need them, they’ll arrive on time. For the ceremony, all the athletes will have them.”

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1 p.m.

Pyeongchang Olympics organizers say the Korean man who died after being found unresponsive at a media village was a 53-year-old interpreter working for a consortium of Japanese broadcasters.

Organizing committee spokesman Sung Baik-you says the man had cardiac arrest.

The man was not responsive when he was found Friday in his room by a co-worker. He was pronounced dead on arrival at a nearby hospital.

Sung says organizers will not release the man’s name out of respect for the man’s family.

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12:40 p.m.

How do Olympians celebrate winning gold medals? If you’re Ester Ledecka of the Czech Republic, you go to KFC.

Ledecka had a surprise victory Saturday in the super-G at the Pyeongchang Olympics. She’s also a snowboarder, and that was supposed to be her best chance for a medal.

Associated Press reporters ran into her later that night at the KFC not far from the snowboard course, where she’ll compete Thursday in qualifying for the parallel giant slalom.

She said she still couldn’t really believe she’d won. Clearly, she hadn’t made plans for a big celebration.

She ate quietly, basically unnoticed, with three other members of the Czech contingent.

As she stood up to leave, she casually picked up her gold medal and draped it around her neck. The people at the next table clapped.

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11:40 a.m.

Ole Einar Bjoerndalen, the “king of the biathlon,” says he’s anxious to see Norway cross-country skier Marit Bjoergen surpass his record of 13 medals and become the most decorated athlete in the history of the Winter Games.

Bjoergen won her 13th medal Saturday, taking home gold in the women’s relay.

Bjoerndalen thinks Bjoergen will break the record before the games are over. There are two more women’s cross-country events — the team sprint relay on Wednesday and the mass start on Sunday.

Bjoergen, who is 37, says she won’t allow herself to think about the record. She’s just focused on the next race.

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11:20 a.m.

Marcel Hirscher of Austria has taken a big first-run lead in the Olympic men’s giant slalom and is well positioned for his second gold medal of the Pyeongchang Games.

Hirscher was 0.63 seconds faster than Alexis Pinturault of France. They finished 1-2 in the Alpine combined on Tuesday.

A Norwegian is third, but it isn’t Henrik Kristoffersen, who is Hirscher’s main rival in the World Cup.

Leif Kristian Nestvold-Haugen has 0.66 to make up on Hirscher in the second run this afternoon. Kristoffersen was 1.31 back in 10th place.

American Ted Ligety is struggling to retain his Olympic, trailing by 2.44 and out of the top 15.

North Koreans Choe Myong Gwang and Kang Song Il are scheduled to start wearing the last two bibs, Nos. 109 and 110.

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10:45 a.m.

Two top racers have had crashing falls though the finish line in the Olympic men’s giant slalom.

Both Luca de Aliprandini of Italy and Manuel Feller of Austria lost balance approaching the next-to-last gate and were disqualified.

De Aliprandini was set for the second-fastest time behind leader Marcel Hirscher of Austria when he went across the course into safety nets. He appeared to hurt his left leg.

Feller was turned around and slid backwards on his back. The race started under blue skies on a clear, cold day at Yongpyong Alpine Center.

Hirscher, who already won gold in Alpine combined, was fastest by 0.63 seconds after 10 skiers had started.

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10:15 a.m.

The world’s best male Alpine skier, Marcel Hirscher, will compete for his second gold medal of the Pyeongchang Olympics.

Hirscher starts as the favorite in the giant slalom Sunday at Yongpyong Alpine Center. He’s already got a gold medal from his first event, the Alpine combined.

The 28-year-old Austrian is expected to duel with his main rival in World Cup races, Henrik Kristoffersen of Norway. American Ted Ligety will try to defend the title he won at the 2014 Sochi Olympics.

Also Sunday, there are men’s preliminary-round hockey games between Canada and Korea and between Finland and Sweden, among others. In women’s hockey, Switzerland will play Korea and Sweden will play Japan, though none is a medal contender.

And the bobsled competition kicks off with the first heats for the men’s two-man teams, with medals to be awarded Monday.

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More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org

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Braaten Is 1st Kenworthy Last In Olympic Slopestyle

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Gus Kenworthy’s Olympics turned into Oystein Braaten’s party.

Braaten, a 22-year-old from Norway, captured the gold medal in ski slopestyle Sunday, far outdistancing the dinged-up Kenworthy, who failed to land any of his three runs and came in last.

Braaten, who learned the sport by setting up rails and jumps in his backyard, edged out American Nick Goepper, who added a silver medal to the bronze he won four years ago in Sochi.

Alex Beaulieu-Marchand of Canada took this year’s bronze.

But most of the eyeballs on this sunny day at the action park were on Kenworthy, the 26-year-old from Colorado who came out as gay about two years after capturing the silver medal in Russia. He has since become a strong, steady voice in the LGBT community, and has used the Pyeongchang Games to amplify his message .

“It didn’t work out for me, which is a bummer,” Kenworthy said. “I would’ve loved to have landed a run for sure. Definitely disappointing.”

But there were other victories that, in the long run, will probably be even bigger than the gold medal.

NBC showed Kenworthy kissing his boyfriend , Matt Wilkas, at the bottom after qualifying, as the two stood amid a number of rainbow gay-pride flags waving in the crowd during a break in the action.

“I didn’t even know that was a televised moment at all,” Kenworthy said. “That’s something that’s amazing. It’s something I wanted at the last Olympics, was to share a kiss with my boyfriend at the bottom and it’s something I was too scared to do for myself. And so, to be able to do that, to give him a kiss, to have that affection broadcast to the world, is incredible.”

It capped what has been a whirlwind of a week for Kenworthy, who broke his thumb in training earlier in the week and had to have several milliliters of blood drained from his hip — injuries he detailed to his growing number of followers on social media .

Was it still an OK day?

“I think so,” Wilkas said. “I know he’s happy to have just been here and to have made it into the finals. It’s amazing. He was injured going into this. It limited his competition. He did great in qualification. Maybe he was just too injured to follow through in this. I don’t know.”

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More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org

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