Flu map reveals 10 areas on brink of epidemic – with deadly Aussie and Japanese strains rife

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FLU is on the brink of epidemic levels in parts of England — with York worst for infections.

Numbers battling the virus have rocketed 78 per cent in a week, says the Royal College of GPs.

 Flu is on the brink of epidemic levels in parts of England Flu is on the brink of epidemic levels in parts of England

Separate stats reveal GP flu consultations in York are at 104.4 per 100,000 people – with a surge in cases of Japanese flu, and more people fighting the deadly Aussie strain.

A level of 108.9 per 100,000 signals an epidemic.

Other badly-hit areas include Herefordshire (99.7), Gateshead (88.2) and Hampshire (86.8).

The average across England is 34.9.

Bethany Walker passed away after she fell ill at home ​after ​contracting ​​the flu  GP flu consultations in York are at 104.4 per 100,000 peopleGetty – Contributor GP flu consultations in York are at 104.4 per 100,000 people  Other badly-hit areas include Herefordshire, Gateshead and HampshireGetty – Contributor Other badly-hit areas include Herefordshire, Gateshead and Hampshire

The winter toll is at least 93 in England and Scotland.

Victims include Bethany Walker, 18, who died of pneumonia in hospital in Inverness.

Meanwhile, experts have warned the crisis may get worse before it improves.

Prof Simon de Lusignan, of the Royal College of GPs, said: “We can certainly say that last week was when flu in England took off.

“However, given how unpredictable flu can be, it is impossible to say how this will progress. Rates may increase, level out or even decline.”

Here’s what you need to know about the deadly ‘Aussie Flu’ sweeping across the UK

In the last week, the NHS has been swamped with patients suffering from “Japanese flu”, which is a particular risk to kids.

The strain of influenza B was responsible for half of the 4,000 people rushed to hospital with the virus.

The deadlier Aussie flu – a potent strain that caused havoc in Oz – was responsible for one in five admissions – around 842 in total.

Dr Adam Kucharski, at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, warned the UK could be in trouble if the virus mutates.

He said: “The main factor that influences the size of an outbreak is the level of immunity against the current flu strains.

“If this year’s viruses are sufficiently different to strains that circulated in previous years – and to the strains covered by the vaccine – it can result in a larger outbreak.”




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